VFW POST 3348

Shoreline, North Seattle & Vicinty

WELCOME TO VFW POST 3348

Teamwork ~ Leadership ~ Commitment
Blackburn-Aurora VFW Post 3348 welcomes you to our web site. There are many facets of this web site, please take some time to avail yourself of those. 
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Your life is valuable to us. If you have any thoughts of ending your life; we ask you to reconsider. You can talk to us; it is safe. If you are desperate, call the VA Crisis line (800) 273-8255 & press "1".
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As yesterday's defenders of freedom, we welcome today's military service members into our ranks to become part of VFW Post 3348.  Our common bond: we served in an area of conflict as a U.S. Armed Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force,  USMC or Coast Guard) member.

Whether that service was in Vietnam, Cambodia, Iran (failed hostage rescue), Lebanon, Libya (bombing Gadhafi), Panama, Grenada, Gulf I, Somalia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq, etc.  

We are all veterans and we welcome other veterans. We take pride in your service and we provide a safe place to talk about your experience, should you choose to do so. We have been there. 
  
What distinguishes VFW from the American Legion is that eligibility requires that a member of the VFW has served in an area of conflict where their life was in eminent danger due to that conflict.
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Announcements

 Trump picks General Mark Milley as next top military adviser

© Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times General Mark Milley led troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

December 8, 2018

 

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump says he's tapping U.S. Army General Mark Milley as his next top military adviser.  General Milley is a battle-hardened commander who has served as Chief of the Army for the last 3 years. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, General Milley would succeed Marine General Joseph Dunford as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

 

The date of transition is being determined. General Dunford is a former Commandant of the Marine Corps and commander of coalition troops in Afghanistan. His term as Joint Chiefs chairman ends October 1, 2018. General Milley commanded troops during several tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and has served as the U.S. Army's top officer since August 2015

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December 7, 2018

VFW Remembers President Bush: "President George H.W. Bush was highly admired within the veteran community and beyond,” said VFW National Commander B.J. Lawrence. "He served as a Navy fighter pilot in the World War II Pacific Theater, as a U.S. congressman, U.S. ambassador, as CIA director, then vice president to President Ronald Reagan for eight years before being elected president, where he would win a resounding war against Iraq and end the Cold War.

 

Our 41st president was also the last of 8 presidents to earn the title of VFW member,” he said. President Bush was a Life member of the VFW Department of Texas. "On behalf of the entire 1.6 million-member VFW family, our deepest condolences go out to the entire Bush family, and we thank them for their strength and support that enabled him to continue serving our great nation for so long. Bravo Zulu.” 

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Pearl Harbor Day 2018: VFW National Commander B.J. Lawrence and VFW Auxiliary National President Sandi Kriebel joined hundreds of veterans, active-duty military, their families and supporters at the Pearl Harbor Visitors Center to commemorate the 77th anniversary of the attack.

 

They presented a VFW wreath in memory of the 2,403 military service members and civilians who were killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and took a moment to reflect on this year’s commemorative theme, "Forging the Future,” which pays tribute to President Roosevelt’s famous 1943 "Unconquerable Spirit” speech. Learn more.

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MIA Update:This week, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced 8 new identifications. Returning home with full military honors are:

 

-- Army Private First-Class John A. Taylor was a member of Company C, 2nd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On Aug. 11, his regiment encountered a Korean People’s Army unit near the village of Haman. Taylor’s company was ordered to move southwest, where they were ambushed and forced to disperse. After several days of checking adjoining units, aid stations and field hospitals, Taylor was reported as killed in action on Aug. 12, 1950. Interment services are pending. Read about Taylor.

 

-- Army Master Sergeant Carl H. Lindquist was a member of Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. In late November 1950, his unit was assembled with South Korean soldiers in the 31st Regimental Combat Team on the east side of the Chosin River, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by Chinese forces. Lindquist was reported missing in action on Nov. 29, 1950, when he could not be accounted for after the withdrawal. Interment services are pending. Read about Lindquist.

 


-- Army Air Forces 1st Lieutenant Ottaway B. Cornwell was a member of the 4th Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group, Twelfth (XII) Air Force. On Jan. 27, 1944, the Supermarine Spitfire aircraft he was piloting was shot down over Pierrefeu-du-Var, France, during a dog fight with a German Messerschmitt. After Allied forces liberated the area, they were unable to locate Cornwell’s remains. Interment services are pending. Read about Cornwell.

 


-- Navy Radioman 3rd Class Jack R. Goldwater was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Goldwater. Interment services are pending. Read about Goldwater.

 


-- Navy Fireman 1st Class Leonard R. Geller was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Geller. Interment services are pending. Read about Geller.

 


-- Navy Reserve Musician 1st Class Henri C. Mason was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Mason. Interment services are pending. Read about Mason.

 


-- Navy Shopfitter 3rd Class John M. Donald was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Donald. Interment services are pending. Read about Donald.

 


-- Navy Seaman 2nd Class George A. Thompson was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Thompson. Interment services are pending. Read about Thompson.

 

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 Suicide prevention 

The Truth About 22 Veteran Suicides A Day

 

June 2, 2015 --- By Stacy Bare

 

While the suicide rate among veterans from operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom is still too high, it’s not 22 a day.

 

There is a statistic that has been widely quoted in the veteran community that highlights an estimated 22 veterans a day are committing suicide. It is a deeply troubling statistic and has galvanized the veteran movement, both from inside the military and veteran communities, and externally, to bring about a wide range of programming nationwide. The statistic is misunderstood.

 

This figure — 22 veterans a day commit suicide — while widely touted by politicians, media outlets, veterans service organizations, among others, comes from the VA’s 2012 Suicide Data Report, which analyzed the death certificates of 21 states from 1999 - 2011, and often is not provided within the right context. The report itself, as cited by the Washington Post earlier this year, warned, "It is recommended that the estimated number of veterans be interpreted with caution due to the use of data from a sample of states and existing evidence of uncertainty in veteran identifiers on U.S. death certificates.” As an example, the average age of veteran suicides within the data set was nearly 60 years old, not representative of Iraq and Afghanistan veteran’s generation.

 

A more recent study, which surveyed 1.3 million veterans who were discharged between 2001 - 2007, found that "Between 2001 - 2009, there were 1650 deployed veterans and 7703 non-deployed veteran deaths. Of those, 351 were suicides among deployed veterans and 1517 were suicides among non-deployed veterans. That means over 9 years, there was not quite one veteran suicide a day,” according to the Washington Post.

 

While veterans have a suicide rate 50% higher than those who did not serve in the military, the suicide rate was, per the LA Times, "…slightly higher among veterans who never deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq, suggesting that the causes extend beyond the trauma of war.” Coming home from war, a 6-month deployment on a ship, or simply transitioning from a life in uniform to a life without one, can be difficult and the various systems set up to deal with this transition and life after military services are unable to meet the need.

 

That is not to say these programs — the VA entitlement and benefit programs like medical care, G.I. Bill, VA Home Loan, etc. — are not helpful; they are. But, for my generation of veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, our suicide rate is closer to one a day and most likely to occur in the first three years of return. While this this is still very troubling, it is not 22.

 

Still, there are further steps needed in bridging the gap created by those who serve and those who don’t. Supporting integration back into families and communities requires robust public-private partnerships. The veterans, as well as the communities they live in, are both responsible for filling or bridging that gap, though not necessarily equally.

 

Challenges of adjustment and transition, PTSD, traumatic brain injuries, and physical disabilities, all need to be addressed especially as these result in barriers to education, employment, health care, and overall individual well-being. Many of these needs are being met by a combination of different veteran-serving nonprofits and VA support. Unfortunately, there are still gaps in the system.

 

We in the veteran advocacy community need to tailor our programming, especially if we are in the business of preventing suicides, to respond to what we’ve learned from the data. One suicide is one suicide too many. Effective programming to help service members, veterans, and families transition to a positive life after service in their first three years home from service is a must.

 

Another requirement is fostering supportive community relationships for veterans, and really for all people, when life gets difficult as they surge past the age of 50. It means that if we are serious about tackling the problem, we need to be creating, or rather shifting, programming specifically to address the needs of older veterans while maintaining preventative care for recently returned veterans.

 

As soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines, we all prided ourselves in uniform on not making the emotional decision, but the right decision. As veterans, we’re far more resilient than we’ve given ourselves credit for. If we do our job now and extend a helping hand to our brothers and sisters over 50, we can decrease that suicide rate, and ensure our generation avoids despair in the future.

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Here's Why the Army Changed the Name of New WWII-Style Uniform 

 Prototypes of the Army Greens uniform, shown above. Initial fielding of the new uniform is expected to occur in the summer of 2020. (US Army photo)

Prototypes of the Army Greens uniform, shown above. Initial fielding of the new uniform is expected to occur in the summer of 2020. (US Army photo)

 

November 23, 2018 --- Military.com | By Matthew Cox

 

The U.S. Army's new uniform may look a lot like the iconic pinks-and-greens worn during World War II, but senior leaders decided to drop the pinks and go with Army Greens as the official name. Pinks and greens "was a World War II nickname given to it by the soldiers because one of the sets of pants had a pink hue to them. So that is where it came from," Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel Dailey said.

 

The Army Greens, which will become the new service uniform in 2028, will feature taupe-colored pants and a green jacket. The current blue Army Service Uniform (ASU), will become the optional dress uniform and undergo a name change of its own, Dailey said. Officials are working on the wear regulations for both uniforms. Once Army Chief of Staff General Mark Milley approves them, the service will release All Army Activities (ALARACT) messages online so soldiers can "click and see the updates to the new regulations," Dailey said.

 

"So basically, we are dusting off old regulations. We will take a look at them. We have a few more decisions we have to present to the chief of staff before we can publish those," he said, adding that the regulation on the ASU will include a new name for the uniform. "It will not be called the Army Service Uniform anymore. It will probably go back to the dress blues."

 

The ASU became mandatory for wear in 2014, replacing the Army dress green uniform, which saw 61 years of service. The service plans to begin issuing the Army Greens to new soldiers in summer 2020. Troops will also have the option to begin buying the new uniform at that time. The next step, though, will be to issue the new uniform to about 200 recruiters who will wear the Army Greens for a few months and then provide feedback for possible last-minute changes to the final design, officials said.

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Army May Stop Issuing Dress Uniforms to Recruits in Basic Training  

 With the historic World War II Fort Benning Barracks behind them, U.S. Army soldiers march across Inouye Parade Field for their Initial Entry Training (IET) graduation ceremony, March 17, 2017, at the National infantry Museum. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Albright)


With the historic World War II Fort Benning Barracks behind them, U.S. Army soldiers march across Inouye Parade Field for their Initial Entry Training (IET) graduation ceremony, March 17, 2017, at the National infantry Museum. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Albright)

 

November 22, 2018 --- Military.com | By Matthew Cox

 

The U.S. Army is considering issuing the new Army Greens uniform to new soldiers when they go to their first unit, instead of following the tradition of issuing the dress uniform at the beginning of Basic Combat Training. The service intends to begin issuing the Army Greens -- a version of the World War II pinks and greens -- in summer 2020, but it may wait until after Initial Entry Training is over to avoid giving new uniforms to soldiers who don't complete training.

 

"It boils down to attrition," said Colonel Stephen Thomas, head of Project Manager Soldier Protection & Individual Equipment. Out of the roughly 110,000 recruits who go to basic training, about 104,000 make it to Advanced Individual Training (AIT). "So then, by the time they go from AIT to their first unit, that number drops down to about 94,000," Thomas said. "And so, if you do the math, that's about 16,000 soldiers ... that are dropped and so there is an opportunity to realize a cost savings by issuing the uniform to soldiers when they go to their first unit, as opposed to issuing the uniform at basic training."

 

Army officials have said the Army Greens will cost more than the current blue Army Service Uniform (ASU) because it is designed to be higher quality and last 6 years compared to the ASU's 4-year life. Soldiers who have already completed training must buy the Army Greens by 2028, but officials have not released a cost estimate for the new uniform. Once Army Greens become official in 2028, the ASU will become the service's optional dress uniform.

 

While no decision has been made, issuing the new uniform to soldiers at their first unit would also benefit Drill Sergeants, according to Sergeant Major Daniel Dailey. "The only reason we issue the dress uniform during basic training is the graduation ceremony at the end," he said. "Logistically, that is very difficult, and we rush to get those soldiers that uniform."

 

Issuing it later would give more "time to our Drill Sergeants in order to train rather than just going back for fitting of uniforms back and forth," Dailey said. New soldiers could graduate in their Operational Camouflage Uniform, "which they are already issued, and they would get a higher-quality, better-fitting Army Greens uniform if they had more time to work individually with a tailor" at their first unit.                                                                    ====================

 

 

 

 

November 21, 2018


Korean War Remains Uncovered Inside DMZ: This past week, South Korea’s defense ministry announced that 5 sets of remains from the Korean War had been unearthed during demining operations around the Cheorwon area, in the vicinity of Arrowhead Hill. This recent discovery brings the total number of remains unearthed in this area to 9.

 

This effort is the result of a joint agreement between North Korea and South Korea to remove weapons and munitions along the 155-mile long Demilitarized Zone that separates the two Koreas, and to identify and return any remains that are recovered in the process. Currently, there are 7,675 Americans who remain unaccounted for from the Korean War and more than 133,000 South Koreans.

 

MIA Update: The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced 6 new identifications. Returning home with full military honors are:

 

-- Army Private First Class Leo J. Duquette a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North Korean forces near Choch’iwon, South Korea. Duquette could not be accounted for and was declared missing in action on July 11, 1950. Interment services are pending. Read about Duquette.


-- Army Private First Class John W. Martin was a member of Medical Company, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. In late November 1950, his unit was assembled with South Korean soldiers in the 31st Regimental Combat Team on the east side of the Chosin River, North Korea, when his unit was attacked by Chinese forces. Martin was among more than 1,000 members of the RCT killed or captured in enemy territory and was declared missing on Dec. 2, 1950. Interment services are pending. Read about Martin.


 -- Army Private First Class Lewis E. Price was a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 109th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division. In November 1944, his unit moved into the Hürtgen Forest in Germany, to relieve U.S. forces who had been fighting for weeks. The fighting in and around the forest was frequently chaotic, and while details surrounding his loss are sparse, he was reported missing in action as of Nov. 6, 1944. Interment services are pending.  Read about Price.


-- Navy Reserve Ensign Charles M. Stern was stationed on the USS Oklahoma, it was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on Dec. 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to capsize. The attack resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Stern. Interment services pending. Read about Stern.


-- Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Ulis C. Steely was stationed on the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on Dec. 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to capsize. The attack resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Steely. Interment services pending. Read about Steely.


-- Navy Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Charles H. Harris was stationed on the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on Dec. 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to capsize. The attack resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Harris. Interment services are pending. Read about Harris.

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 Soldiers to Get New Greens Uniform in 2020 After Army Finalizes Design  

Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey stands with Soldier models wearing the proposed Pink & Green daily service uniform at the Army-Navy game in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 9, 2017. (US Army photo by Ron Lee)

Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey stands with Soldier models wearing the proposed Pink & Green daily service uniform at the Army-Navy game in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 9, 2017. (US Army photo by Ron Lee)

 

November 20, 2018 --- Military.com | By Matthew Cox

 

The Army plans to begin issuing its newly announced Army Greens to new soldiers beginning in summer 2020, the service's senior enlisted leader said.  Army Secretary Mark Esper approved the Nov. 11 adoption of the much-discussed Army Greens, which all soldiers must wear by 2028. The new uniform is a version of the iconic pinks-and-greens uniform Army officers wore during World War II.

 

"This uniform is still in the minds of many Americans. This nation came together during World War II and fought and won a great war," Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel Dailey said in a briefing with reporters at the Pentagon. "That's what the secretary and Chief of Staff of the Army General Mark Milley wanted to do, is capitalize on the greatest generation because there is another great generation that is serving today, and that is the soldiers serving in the United States Army."

 

Soldiers currently serving in the active duty, National Guard and Reserves will be able to purchase the new uniform in summer 2020, but do not have to buy it until 2028. The current blue Army Service Uniform (ASU) will become the service's optional dress uniform. "I know it seems like a long time," Dailey said, explaining that the extended phase-in period is designed to give enlisted soldiers time to save up their annual clothing allowance to pay for the new uniform. "We've got to give the soldier ample time to be paid for those uniform items prior to it being required for them to wear it." He said it is "premature" to release the estimated cost of the new uniform.

 

"We have an estimated cost," he said. "We are not done with any contracting at this point, so it is premature to give you any costs. What we know is that, because of the measures we are taking, it will be cost neutral to the taxpayer and the soldier in the long run." Dailey justified the cost of the new, more-expensive Army Greens uniform by saying it will last longer than the current-issue ASU.

 

"The estimated cost of the new Army Greens uniform is higher than that of the current service blue uniform ... because it is a higher-quality uniform," he said. "We could easily make it the same cost, but that's not the intent here. The intent here is to increase the quality of the uniform, and that is why we extended the life of the uniform."

 

The new Greens jacket will be made of a 55%/45% "poly-wool elastique." The pants will feature a gabardine weave made of a 55/45 poly-wool combination as well. The shirt will be made of a 75%/25% cotton-poly blend, said Army officials, explaining that service life of the Army Greens is six years compared to the ASU's 4 years.

 

"We went for a higher-quality fabric. The uniform costs more as a result ... but we intended to do that because one of the chief of staff of the Army's directives to us was build a higher-quality uniform, which inherently costs more," Dailey said. "And the way you offset that is you capitalize on the life of that uniform based upon its higher quality."

 

Despite the announcement, the Army Greens design is not yet finalized. There were some design changes all the way up until the week before the secretary made the decision," Dailey said. The uniform prototype Dailey wore recently at the Association of the United States Army's annual meeting in October featured a jacket belt with a gold buckle, adding that the final design will be more subdued.

 

"The Chief of Staff has made a slight change on the length of the collar on the male jacket," Dailey said. "From a design perspective, it's the right decision the chief made." The jacket buttons will also feature an antique finish instead of a brass color. "The next set of photographs we want to get out to the media, we want them to be accurate" to show the final design, Dailey said. Before the Army starts issuing the redesigned uniform to the force, the service intends to field 200 sets of Army Greens for a final evaluation.

 

"We are in process of getting 200 uniforms out to designated forward-facing units ... and when I say 'forward-facing units,' I'm talking recruiters," said Colonel Stephen Thomas, head of Project Manager Soldier Protection & Individual Equipment. "Then, what we will do is get feedback from those soldiers on how to better refine the uniform so that we have a uniform design that soldiers like." Officials from Program Executive Office Soldier said the process should be complete by mid-2019. "This is a great day to be a solder," Dailey said. "As I go around and have talked to soldiers in the last few days ... they are very excited about the new uniform."                                                                                                                                  ===========

  

 

 


November 16, 2018 --- MIA Update: The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced 2 new identifications, and the burial date and location for 11 previously identified servicemen. Returning home with full military honors are:


-- Army Corporal Francisco Ramos-Rivera, 33, of Puerto Rico, whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Nov. 29 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Ramos-Rivera was a member of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, engaged in combat operations against North Korean forces near Taegon, South Korea. As U.S. forces regrouped after their evacuation, Ramos-Rivera could not be accounted for and was declared missing in action on July 20, 1950.  Read about Ramos-Rivera.


-- Army Privite Robert J. Sipes, Jr., 19, of Irvington, Ky., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 5 in his hometown. Sipes was a member of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He was killed in action on Nov. 30, 1950, during heavy fighting between the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces and the 7th Cavalry Regiment near the village of Unsan, North Korea. His remains were processed through a 7th Cavalry Regiment Collection Station on Dec. 1, 1950, and interred at the United Nations Military Cemetery (UNMC) Pyongyang, on Dec. 2, 1950.Read about Sipes.


-- Army Air Forces 1st Lieutenant Eugene P. Ford, 21, of Latrobe, Pa., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 4 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. Ford was a member of the 765th Bombardment Squadron, 461st Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force. On Dec. 17, 1944, Ford’s B-24J, known as the Tulsamerican, led a group of six B-24s on a bombing mission targeting oil refineries at Odertal, Germany. After emerging from a cloud bank near the target, the aircraft were attacked by more than 40 German Me-109 and FW-190 fighters. Three of the six aircraft were shot down and the other three suffered damages. Ford’s plane was heavily damaged, forcing him to abort the mission and crash land in the Adriatic Sea near the Isle of Vis in present-day Croatia. Seven crewmembers survived and were rescued, but Ford and two others were killed in the crash. Read about Ford.


-- Marine Corps Reserve Staff Sergeant Richard J. Murphy, Jr., 26, of Chevy Chase, Md., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 1 in Silver Spring, Maryland. Murphy was a member of 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, which landed at Red Beach, Saipan. Reports provide little information of what happened to Murphy after landing on Saipan, and he was declared missing in action as of June 15, 1944. On May 22, 1945, his status was amended to killed in action. Read about Murphy


-- Marine Corps Private First Class Clarence E. Drumheiser, 21, of Fresno, Calif., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 8 in Prairie View, Texas. Drumheiser was assigned to Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force. On Nov. 19, 1943, Drumheiser’s unit landed on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll against stiff Japanese resistance. Drumheiser was killed on the third day of the battle, one of approximately 1,000 Marines and sailors killed in the intense fighting. Read about Drumheiser.


 -- Navy Fireman Petty Officer 1st Class Bert E. McKeeman, 25, of Council Bluffs, Iowa, whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 1 in his hometown. McKeeman was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, on Dec. 7, 1941, when the ship sustained multiple torpedo hits and quickly capsized, resulting in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including McKeeman. Read about McKeeman.


-- Navy Fireman Petty Officer 2nd Class Martin A. Gara, 20, of Chicago, whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 4 in Santa Fe, N.M. Gara was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, on Dec. 7, 1941, when the ship sustained multiple torpedo hits & quickly capsized, resulting in deaths of 429 crewmen, including Gara. Read about Gara.


-- Navy Seaman Petty Officer 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz, 26, of Appleton, Wisc., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 7 in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. Bruesewitz was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, on Dec. 7, 1941, when the ship sustained multiple torpedo hits and quickly capsized, resulting in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Bruesewitz. Read about Bruesewitz.


-- Navy Fireman Petty Officer 2nd Class Carl D. Dorr, 27, of Anderson, S.C., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 7 in Greenville, S.C. Dorr was assigned to USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, on Dec. 7, 1941, when the ship sustained multiple torpedo hits & quickly capsized, resulting in deaths of 429 crewmen, including Dorr. Read about Dorr


-- Navy Fireman Petty Officer 1st Class Albert U. Kane, 26, of Fort Worth, Texas, whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 7 in Dallas. Kane was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, on Dec. 7, 1941, when the ship sustained multiple torpedo hits & quickly capsized, resulting in deaths of 429 crewmen, including Kane. Read about Kane.


 -- Navy Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade, 24, of Calhoun City, Miss., whose remains were previously identified, will be buried Dec. 7 in the Mississippi Veterans Memorial Cemetery, in Newton County, Miss. Wade was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, on Dec. 7, 1941, when the ship sustained multiple torpedo hits and quickly capsized, resulting in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Wade. Read about Wade.


-- Marine Corps Reserve Pfc. Nicholas J. Gojmerac was a member of Company Q, 4th Raider Battalion, 1st Marine Raider Regiment, when his unit assaulted a Japanese stronghold at Bairoko Harbor, New Georgia Island, Solomon Islands. He was reported missing in action on July 20, 1943, after he was last seen crawling through heavy fire to provide medical care to an injured Marine while he was mortally wounded himself. Interment services are pending. Read about Gojmerac.


-- Navy Reserve Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class John O. Morris was a member of Carrier Aircraft Service Unit (CASU) 17 and was tasked with securing the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll. In November 1943, U.S. personnel on the island encountered fierce resistance by the Japanese, and almost 1,000 Marines and sailors were killed, and another 1,000 were wounded in the battle. On Dec. 16, 1943, Morris was killed when a machine gun he was test-firing accidentally discharged, resulting in his death. Interment services are pending. Read about Morris.
 

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 Female Marines Get Deadline to Wear New Dress Blues Coats 

 A parade staff with Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., stands in their position during a Friday Evening Parade at the Barracks May 31, 2013. (Dengrier Baez/Marine Corps)

A parade staff with Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., stands in their position during a Friday Evening Parade at the Barracks May 31, 2013. 

 

October 19, 2018 --- Military.com

 

Weeks after women at boot camp began receiving new unisex-style dress coats, female Marines across the fleet have been issued a deadline for phasing out the open-collared version they've worn for decades. Female Marines have until September 30, 2022, to wear the current women's dress coat, according to a service-wide administrative message announcing a slew of uniform changes. After that, the current dress coat and white shirt will be "deemed obsolete," the message states, at which time "the new female blue dress coat will become the required dress uniform coat."

 

Women who are ready to make the switch to the new coat, which looks more like the coat that men wear and features a high, closed collar, don't have to wait 4 years to do so. Starting October 1, 2018 both versions were approved for wear. This year’s clothing-replacement allowances for female active-duty enlisted Marines was adjusted on October 1st to account for the cost of the new coat. But it will take 4 years to fully cover the replacement using that allowance, said Mary Boyt, program manager for the Marine Corps Uniform Board. Female officers will have to buy the new coat at their expense sometime before the mandatory possession date, Boyt said, since they don’t get a clothing allowance.

 

In August 2018, about 100 members of Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, at Parris Island, South Carolina, became the first women to receive the new coats during their initial uniform issue. Female Marines should be mindful that while the new coat looks a lot like the coat that men wear, there are some differences. The shift toward more gender-neutral uniforms for Marines and sailors started under former Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, who said he wanted troops in the sea services to look more uniform, regardless of gender.

 

Some women have said the move was misguided, and about half of senior officers and noncommissioned officers surveyed said they preferred to keep their old looks. Those Marines have been given a 4-year period to do so. Aside from issuing the deadline, the new administrative message also details proper belt, badge and ribbon placements for female Marines wearing the new coats.  

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