VFW POST 3348

Shoreline, North Seattle & Vicinty

WELCOME TO VFW POST 3348

Teamwork ~ Leadership ~ Commitment
Blackburn-Aurora VFW Post 3348 welcomes you to our web site. There are many facets of this web site, please take some time to avail yourself of those. 
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Your life is valuable to us. If you have any thoughts of ending your life; we ask you to reconsider. You can talk to us; it is safe. If you are desperate, call the VA Crisis line (800) 273-8255 & press "1".
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As yesterday's defenders of freedom, we welcome today's military service members into our ranks to become part of VFW Post 3348.  Our common bond: we served in an area of conflict as a U.S. Armed Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force,  USMC or Coast Guard) member.

Whether that service was in Vietnam, Cambodia, Iran (failed hostage rescue), Lebanon, Libya (bombing Gadhafi), Panama, Grenada, Gulf I, Somalia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq, etc.  

We are all veterans and we welcome other veterans. We take pride in your service and we provide a safe place to talk about your experience, should you choose to do so. We have been there. 
  
What distinguishes VFW from the American Legion is that eligibility requires that a member of the VFW has served in an area of conflict where their life was in eminent danger due to that conflict.
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Announcements

SpecOps Recruiting Squadron Helps Air Force Combat 'Runaway Attrition'

A joint special forces team move together out of a U.S. Air Force CV-22 Osprey Feb. 26, 2018, at Melrose Training Range, New Mexico. (U.S. Air Force photo/Clayton Cupit)

 

A joint special forces team move together out of a U.S. Air Force CV-22 Osprey February 26, 2018, at Melrose Training Range, New Mexico. (U.S. Air Force photo/Clayton Cupit)

 

January 18, 2019 --- Military.com | By Oriana Pawlyk

 

With the help of a new recruiting squadron, the U.S. Air Force is getting a better sense of what type of airmen are needed for the next dynamic conflict. The service established its first Special Operations Recruiting Squadron last year to find next-generation combat airmen. Recruiters and mentors train the airmen in a step-by-step, streamlined program, explained Maj. Heath Kerns, commander of the 330th Recruiting Squadron, headquartered at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas.


Great Pay & High Demand Why Cybersecurity Careers are Ideal for Vets

 

"We needed a different answer to the runaway attrition," Kerns said in an interview with Military.com last week. While each of the Air Force specialty code varies, the average attrition rate in the special operations community hovered around 80% throughout initial selection and training just a few years ago.

 

"This was a decision to go with a different model to focus on quality, so it's the first step of what is now a comprehensive change from initial ascensions all the way to training … and operations as well," he said. The Air Force had already identified recruiters in 2017 to focus on special operations and combat support recruiting. The 330th Recruiting Squadron was stood up June 29, 2018, according to Air Education and Training Command (AETC).

 

The squadron has 120 airmen and 12 flight chiefs spread across the U.S., all focused on bringing special warfare and combat support recruits into the ranks. Previously, an airman would be assessed by a traditional recruiter, head to Basic Military Training (BMT) and go on to the indoctrination course from there.

 

But airmen now get a firsthand glimpse of what their duties will be like, with recruiters and mentors by their side a few times a month. "Our recruiters find them, and then work with them and with our developers," Kerns said.

 

Developers are airmen who previously served in one of the six specialties -- combat controllers; pararescuemen; special operations weather technicians; tactical air control party; survival, evasion, resistance, and escape (SERE); and explosive ordnance disposal airmen (EOD) -- and wanted to serve as coaches or mentors to candidates entering the unit.

 

SERE and EOD are considered combat support, while pararescue (PJ), combat controller, special operations weather technician (SOWT), and tactical air control party (TACP) are considered special operations. "They know what it takes to thrive in those jobs and then also just help [the recruits] so they understand what they're getting into and prepare them mentally and physically," Kerns said.

 

They stress working together as a team, he said. But also, "Can they lead? Can they endure difficult circumstances … and come back for more?" AETC and Air Force Special Operations Command have brought in mental health and physical fitness coaches who are designing the recruit training, "to make them healthier, faster, better, stronger," AETC Commander Lieutenant General Steven Kwast said last year.

 

Special operations recruiters assess candidates for specialized training through the developers to hone their skills. The recruits then continue to BMT and the Special Warfare Preparatory Course.

 

According to AETC, the prep is a seven-week course designed to ensure candidates are prepared as much as possible for the two-year training pipeline of the various special operations careers. Once in that pipeline, airmen undergo some of the most grueling technical training in the U.S. military.

 

The Air Force hasn't deviated in what it's looking for: airmen who present an aptitude for the high-stress battlefield career, as well as those eager to maintain physical fitness and healthy lifestyles. "We're just trying to be realistic with them from the very beginning," added Master Sergeant Michael Williams, a flight chief with the 330th. "Our candidates, whenever we bring them into our program … we can usually have them ready, passing the physical fitness standards, depending on their mental capacity … and resiliency, in about three to four months."

 

It's also about "focusing more on what we have in common than the specialties that make us separate," Kerns said. The squadron shipped out roughly 1,000 special operator candidates to BMT in 2018, he said, adding that it's too early to tell if the unit has had an effect on the overall attrition rate in those career fields.

 

But he said there have been production increases, including a 20 to 24 percent increase in the number of candidates moving into the combat controller and special operations weather technician initial production rate and course. Kerns said the focus is more on quality than quantity of recruits.

 

The 330th has also helped women with an interest in special operations. The 330th has had 12 female candidates since October 1, 2017 -- six SERE, four EOD, 1 TACP, and one SOWT. Five of those women -- three EOD and two SERE -- were recently recruited and have moved on this fiscal year. "We cannot say with certainty if these females are currently in the training pipeline, as some may have self-eliminated or gotten injured," Gonzalez said. There are currently 17 female applicants in development and working with their recruiter, she said.

 

"We want to build a better candidate at the end of the day," said Master Sergeant Daniel Jones of the Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape Specialist Screening Course at the 66th Training Squadron, Detachment 3, at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland. Jones helps oversee the initial entry for SERE courses a candidate would take after his or her time at the 330th.

 

"And what we've seen is a higher success rate in the initial physical standards test" since the 330th's inception, he said. "They're in better overall physical shape. "Physical conditioning aside, the goal is to give new airmen the proper idea of what it takes to be in a high-intensity career field. "It's the airman that's making it happen," Kerns said, referring to combat skills on the ground.

 

"Being ground operators in the Air Force -- we find ourselves at the center of all activity -- you bring the might of the Air Force to the joint battle," he said. "You're connecting all the dots. Since we're always in the center, always in the chaos and having to be the calm through that storm … it's the airmen that are going to start making things happen."

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VFW Wants Coast Guard & DHS Funded: Today marks the 3rd full week of the partial federal government shutdown because Congress and the administration cannot reach an agreement over how much to spend on border protection.

 

"Our government’s first responsibility is to secure the nation and protect her citizens,” said VFW National Commander B.J. Lawrence, who noted that the military is not affected by the current shutdown, but that America’s 5th service — the U.S. Coast Guard — and the rest of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) are very much impacted by the shutdown.

 

"Our country needs this Congress and this White House to push through the rhetoric and take care of those who are on the front lines protecting our country,” he said. "What the Coast Guard and DHS do daily allows the rest of us to sleep easier at night.”

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This week, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced 3 new identifications. Returning home with full military honors are:

 

1) Navy Chief Pharmacist’s Mate James T. Cheshire was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Cheshire. Interment services are pending. Read about Cheshire.


2) Navy Chief Warrant Officer John A. Austin was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Austin. Interment services are pending. Read about Austin.


3) Navy Buglemaster 2nd Class Lionel W. Lescault was stationed aboard the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941. The battleship sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Lescault. Interment services are pending. Read about Lescault.

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Navy's F-35C on Track to Be Combat Ready Next Month 

An F-35C Lightning II assigned to the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 taxis on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shane Bryan)

 

An F-35C Lightning II assigned to the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 taxis on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shane Bryan)

 

January 7, 2019 --- Military.com | By Oriana Pawlyk

 

The U.S. Navy is on track to reach critical milestones and declare its F-35 Joint Strike Fighters ready for combat next month. There have been no reported delays in the service's F-35C reaching initial operating capability (IOC) next month, according to Navy spokeswoman Lt. Lauren Chatmas.

 

The Joint Strike Fighter Fleet Integration Office "is confident in meeting milestones as planned," Chatmas said. While no official February date has been announced, the work "is still on target, still proceeding as planned," she said.

 

Last month, the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 "Argonauts" out of Naval Air Station Lemoore, California, completed a critical milestone aboard the USS Carl Vinson, a turning point in reaching IOC for the Navy's stealth jet. The "Argonauts" are slated to become the service's first operational F-35C squadron. Once IOC ready, VFA-147's first deployment is scheduled aboard the Vinson in 2021.

 

The progression comes as the Navy plans to deactivate its F-35 squadronat Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and move operations to NAS Lemoore, centralizing its Joint Strike Fighter operations out west. The JSF program as a whole is continuing its formal operational test phase, which it entered in December.

 

The Joint Program Office and the aircraft's manufacturer, Lockheed Martin Corp., announced December 6, 2018 that all three F-35 variants belonging to the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps will be field-tested "for the purposes of determining the weapons systems' operational effectiveness and operational suitability for combat."

 

For example, F-35 pilots at Edwards Air Force Base, California -- home to the Air Force Test Center, which tests a variety of aircraft and weapons -- have flown more than 30 missions since the testing was announced, according to the Air Force

"Formal Initial Operational Test & Evaluation will test the system and identify areas for improvement in the most stressing operationally representative environments," JPO spokesman Joe DellaVedova said last month.

 

Pilots, maintainers, engineers and Lockheed Martin officials, among other experts, will work with the JPO and the Defense Department to identify operational and technical areas that could be upgraded or enhanced. The IOT&E testing is expected to be complete late 2019.

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Class-Action Suit Could Aid More Than 50,000 Iraq, Afghanistan War Veterans  

Veterans with PTSD participate in a yoga class at Open Center Yoga in Bristol, Pa. A class-action lawsuit filed against the U.S. Army challenges less-than-honorable discharges given to soldiers who may have had undiagnosed PTSD or other mental conditions. (Kim Weimer/Bucks County Courier Times via AP)

Veterans with PTSD participate in a yoga class at Open Center Yoga in Bristol, Pa. A class-action lawsuit filed against the U.S. Army challenges less-than-honorable discharges given to soldiers who may have had undiagnosed PTSD or other mental conditions. (Kim Weimer/Bucks County Courier Times via AP)

 

December 31, 2018 --- New Haven Register, Connecticut

 

NEW HAVEN -- Through the efforts of a Yale Law School clinic, more than 50,000 U.S.Army veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are part of a newly certified class-action lawsuit that challenges the less than honorable discharges they received.

 

A federal judge Friday certified the suit for those veterans who developed Post Traumatic Brain Injury or other mental health conditions in the service, and subsequently were pushed out for infractions that could be attributable to undiagnosed mental health problems stemming from their military service.

 

Steve Kennedy and Alicia Carson, Army veterans who served at the height of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, were the named plaintiffs in the April 2017 suit on behalf of themselves and tens of thousands of others who have been similarly affected in order to ensure fair treatment when veterans apply to have these service characterizations changed.

 

The plaintiffs are represented by the Yale Law School Veterans Legal Services Clinic and co-counsel at Jenner & Block. Since September 2001, more than 2 million Americans have served in either Iraq or Afghanistan. Nearly a third of them suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and related mental health conditions, but the military continues to issue less-than-honorable ("bad paper") discharges at historically high rates, often for minor infractions.

 

Such characterizations often impose a lifetime of stigma, impair veterans' employment prospects, and deny veterans access to critical government services such as the GI bill, disability benefits and mental health treatment.

 

Although the Army Discharge Review Board (ADRB) promises these veterans a path to correct unjustly harsh discharges, the ADRB frequently denies claims in defiance of recent Department of Defense policies intended to ease this process for veterans with service-connected PTSD and related conditions, according to the plaintiffs.

 

"This decision means that thousands of service members who have been denied the support of VA resources because of an unfair discharge status may have another chance at relief," said Kennedy, who served in Iraq and is a founder of the Connecticut chapter of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

 

"The cost of this continuing refusal to reckon with the reality of mental illness in the military is more than unjustly denied benefits -- it is a generation of lost promise and opportunity for countless soldiers suffering the invisible wounds of war as a result of their sacrifice for country," Kennedy said.

 

The decision follows another recent one approving a nationwide class-action lawsuit of Marine and Navy veterans against the Naval Discharge Review Board, which is also pending in the District of Connecticut. "Almost 5 years ago, the Department of Defense ordered the Army and other service branches to take into account the role that PTSD and other mental health conditions play in veterans' discharges," said Jordan Goldberg, a law student in the Yale Veterans Legal Services Clinic.

 

"But the ADRB continues callously to dismiss veterans' claims in open defiance of these rules. This lawsuit is about holding the Army to its commitments and securing justice for the veterans whose honorable service has gone unrecognized for too long," Goldberg said.

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December 28, 2018 --- Richard Arvin Overton has died.

 

Richard Arvin Overton was an American supercentenarian who at age 112 years, 230 days was the oldest verified surviving U.S. World War II veteran and oldest living man in the United States. He served in the United States Army. In 2013, he was honored by President Barack Obama. He resided in Austin, Texas, until his death. 

 

Born: May 11, 1906 · Bastrop County, TX

 

Death place: Austin, TX

 

Parents: Gentry Overton , Sr. · John Overton , Jr. · Jim Gentry Overton

 

Years of service: 1940–45

 

Allegiance: United States of America

 

Rank: Technician fifth grade, U.S. Army

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 2019 Military Pay Raise Amounts Released 

 (Photo Credit: U.S. Army/C. Todd Lopez)

 

 (Photo Credit: U.S. Army/C. Todd Lopez)

 

December 28, 2018 --- Military.com | By Jim Absher

 

The Defense Department has released the active-duty and reserve drill pay tables for 2019. Most military members will see a 2.6% increase in their base pay for 2019. Allowances, such as Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH), will also see an increase next year.

 

The raise will go into effect January 1, 2019, for most military members. Military retirees also will see an increase in 2019. Service members should see the 2.6% raise in their first January paycheck, typically January 15 for active-duty service members, and the payday following their first "drill weekend" for Guard and reservists.

 

The current partial government shutdown won't affect most military members, since the DoD is funded for 2019. However, Coast Guard members may see their pay, along with any raises, delayed, since they operate under the Department of Homeland Security. That department did not have its 2019 funding approved before the government went into partial shutdown as Congress departed the capital for its holiday break.

 

Check out the 2019 pay charts here.

 

Factors That Affect Military Pay

 

·       The annual pay raise 

·       Longevity raises virtually every 2 years (based on the number of years in service)

·       Promotions 

·       Number of Drill Periods (Guard and Reserve Only) 

·       Basic Allowance for Housing Increases: BAH (based on location). 

·       Basic Allowance for Subsistence Increases: BAS 

·       Special Pay(s) (based on occupations: Language Skills, Combat, Flight, Hazardous Duty). 

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 December 7, 2018

VFW Remembers President Bush: "President George H.W. Bush was highly admired within the veteran community and beyond,” said VFW National Commander B.J. Lawrence. "He served as a Navy fighter pilot in the World War II Pacific Theater, as a U.S. congressman, U.S. ambassador, as CIA director, then vice president to President Ronald Reagan for eight years before being elected president, where he would win a resounding war against Iraq and end the Cold War.

 

Our 41st president was also the last of 8 presidents to earn the title of VFW member,” he said. President Bush was a Life member of the VFW Department of Texas. "On behalf of the entire 1.6 million-member VFW family, our deepest condolences go out to the entire Bush family, and we thank them for their strength and support that enabled him to continue serving our great nation for so long. Bravo Zulu.” 

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Pearl Harbor Day 2018: VFW National Commander B.J. Lawrence and VFW Auxiliary National President Sandi Kriebel joined hundreds of veterans, active-duty military, their families and supporters at the Pearl Harbor Visitors Center to commemorate the 77th anniversary of the attack.

 

They presented a VFW wreath in memory of the 2,403 military service members and civilians who were killed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and took a moment to reflect on this year’s commemorative theme, "Forging the Future,” which pays tribute to President Roosevelt’s famous 1943 "Unconquerable Spirit” speech. Learn more.

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 Here's Why the Army Changed the Name of New WWII-Style Uniform 

 Prototypes of the Army Greens uniform, shown above. Initial fielding of the new uniform is expected to occur in the summer of 2020. (US Army photo)

Prototypes of the Army Greens uniform, shown above. Initial fielding of the new uniform is expected to occur in the summer of 2020. (US Army photo)

 

November 23, 2018 --- Military.com | By Matthew Cox

 

The U.S. Army's new uniform may look a lot like the iconic pinks-and-greens worn during World War II, but senior leaders decided to drop the pinks and go with Army Greens as the official name. Pinks and greens "was a World War II nickname given to it by the soldiers because one of the sets of pants had a pink hue to them. So that is where it came from," Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel Dailey said.

 

The Army Greens, which will become the new service uniform in 2028, will feature taupe-colored pants and a green jacket. The current blue Army Service Uniform (ASU), will become the optional dress uniform and undergo a name change of its own, Dailey said. Officials are working on the wear regulations for both uniforms. Once Army Chief of Staff General Mark Milley approves them, the service will release All Army Activities (ALARACT) messages online so soldiers can "click and see the updates to the new regulations," Dailey said.

 

"So basically, we are dusting off old regulations. We will take a look at them. We have a few more decisions we have to present to the chief of staff before we can publish those," he said, adding that the regulation on the ASU will include a new name for the uniform. "It will not be called the Army Service Uniform anymore. It will probably go back to the dress blues."

 

The ASU became mandatory for wear in 2014, replacing the Army dress green uniform, which saw 61 years of service. The service plans to begin issuing the Army Greens to new soldiers in summer 2020. Troops will also have the option to begin buying the new uniform at that time. The next step, though, will be to issue the new uniform to about 200 recruiters who will wear the Army Greens for a few months and then provide feedback for possible last-minute changes to the final design, officials said.

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 Soldiers to Get New Greens Uniform in 2020 After Army Finalizes Design  

Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey stands with Soldier models wearing the proposed Pink & Green daily service uniform at the Army-Navy game in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 9, 2017. (US Army photo by Ron Lee)

Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey stands with Soldier models wearing the proposed Pink & Green daily service uniform at the Army-Navy game in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 9, 2017. (US Army photo by Ron Lee)

 

November 20, 2018 --- Military.com | By Matthew Cox

 

The Army plans to begin issuing its newly announced Army Greens to new soldiers beginning in summer 2020, the service's senior enlisted leader said.  Army Secretary Mark Esper approved the Nov. 11 adoption of the much-discussed Army Greens, which all soldiers must wear by 2028. The new uniform is a version of the iconic pinks-and-greens uniform Army officers wore during World War II.

 

"This uniform is still in the minds of many Americans. This nation came together during World War II and fought and won a great war," Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel Dailey said in a briefing with reporters at the Pentagon. "That's what the secretary and Chief of Staff of the Army General Mark Milley wanted to do, is capitalize on the greatest generation because there is another great generation that is serving today, and that is the soldiers serving in the United States Army."

 

Soldiers currently serving in the active duty, National Guard and Reserves will be able to purchase the new uniform in summer 2020, but do not have to buy it until 2028. The current blue Army Service Uniform (ASU) will become the service's optional dress uniform. "I know it seems like a long time," Dailey said, explaining that the extended phase-in period is designed to give enlisted soldiers time to save up their annual clothing allowance to pay for the new uniform. "We've got to give the soldier ample time to be paid for those uniform items prior to it being required for them to wear it." He said it is "premature" to release the estimated cost of the new uniform.

 

"We have an estimated cost," he said. "We are not done with any contracting at this point, so it is premature to give you any costs. What we know is that, because of the measures we are taking, it will be cost neutral to the taxpayer and the soldier in the long run." Dailey justified the cost of the new, more-expensive Army Greens uniform by saying it will last longer than the current-issue ASU.

 

"The estimated cost of the new Army Greens uniform is higher than that of the current service blue uniform ... because it is a higher-quality uniform," he said. "We could easily make it the same cost, but that's not the intent here. The intent here is to increase the quality of the uniform, and that is why we extended the life of the uniform."

 

The new Greens jacket will be made of a 55%/45% "poly-wool elastique." The pants will feature a gabardine weave made of a 55/45 poly-wool combination as well. The shirt will be made of a 75%/25% cotton-poly blend, said Army officials, explaining that service life of the Army Greens is six years compared to the ASU's 4 years.

 

"We went for a higher-quality fabric. The uniform costs more as a result ... but we intended to do that because one of the chief of staff of the Army's directives to us was build a higher-quality uniform, which inherently costs more," Dailey said. "And the way you offset that is you capitalize on the life of that uniform based upon its higher quality."

 

Despite the announcement, the Army Greens design is not yet finalized. There were some design changes all the way up until the week before the secretary made the decision," Dailey said. The uniform prototype Dailey wore recently at the Association of the United States Army's annual meeting in October featured a jacket belt with a gold buckle, adding that the final design will be more subdued.

 

"The Chief of Staff has made a slight change on the length of the collar on the male jacket," Dailey said. "From a design perspective, it's the right decision the chief made." The jacket buttons will also feature an antique finish instead of a brass color. "The next set of photographs we want to get out to the media, we want them to be accurate" to show the final design, Dailey said. Before the Army starts issuing the redesigned uniform to the force, the service intends to field 200 sets of Army Greens for a final evaluation.

 

"We are in process of getting 200 uniforms out to designated forward-facing units ... and when I say 'forward-facing units,' I'm talking recruiters," said Colonel Stephen Thomas, head of Project Manager Soldier Protection & Individual Equipment. "Then, what we will do is get feedback from those soldiers on how to better refine the uniform so that we have a uniform design that soldiers like." Officials from Program Executive Office Soldier said the process should be complete by mid-2019. "This is a great day to be a solder," Dailey said. "As I go around and have talked to soldiers in the last few days ... they are very excited about the new uniform."                                                                                                                                  ===========

   

 

 

 

 Female Marines Get Deadline to Wear New Dress Blues Coats 

 A parade staff with Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., stands in their position during a Friday Evening Parade at the Barracks May 31, 2013. (Dengrier Baez/Marine Corps)

A parade staff with Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., stands in their position during a Friday Evening Parade at the Barracks May 31, 2013. 

 

October 19, 2018 --- Military.com

 

Weeks after women at boot camp began receiving new unisex-style dress coats, female Marines across the fleet have been issued a deadline for phasing out the open-collared version they've worn for decades. Female Marines have until September 30, 2022, to wear the current women's dress coat, according to a service-wide administrative message announcing a slew of uniform changes. After that, the current dress coat and white shirt will be "deemed obsolete," the message states, at which time "the new female blue dress coat will become the required dress uniform coat."

 

Women who are ready to make the switch to the new coat, which looks more like the coat that men wear and features a high, closed collar, don't have to wait 4 years to do so. Starting October 1, 2018 both versions were approved for wear. This year’s clothing-replacement allowances for female active-duty enlisted Marines was adjusted on October 1st to account for the cost of the new coat. But it will take 4 years to fully cover the replacement using that allowance, said Mary Boyt, program manager for the Marine Corps Uniform Board. Female officers will have to buy the new coat at their expense sometime before the mandatory possession date, Boyt said, since they don’t get a clothing allowance.

 

In August 2018, about 100 members of Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, at Parris Island, South Carolina, became the first women to receive the new coats during their initial uniform issue. Female Marines should be mindful that while the new coat looks a lot like the coat that men wear, there are some differences. The shift toward more gender-neutral uniforms for Marines and sailors started under former Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, who said he wanted troops in the sea services to look more uniform, regardless of gender.

 

Some women have said the move was misguided, and about half of senior officers and noncommissioned officers surveyed said they preferred to keep their old looks. Those Marines have been given a 4-year period to do so. Aside from issuing the deadline, the new administrative message also details proper belt, badge and ribbon placements for female Marines wearing the new coats.  

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WASHINGTON Today, DAV, Paralyzed Veterans of America and Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States released